What Will Last?

 
Photo by  Josh Boston

Photo by Josh Boston

 
 

"Whatever is not eternal is eternally out of date." - C.S. Lewis

 

 

Over 20 years ago I found something that would become my passion and life's pursuit.

I found art and creativity. 

As a timid teenager lacking confidence and any given propensity towards that which allows one to fit in, I felt lost. I lacked athleticism and ability at most of the activities people engage in throughout early education. I grasped at whatever I could find to appease the need for approval. And there within this struggle for self-realization, I stumbled my way into a high-school choir room that housed an ancient computer; on that computer, in a dimly lit corner of my high-school building, I found graphic design by way of Microsoft Paint. 

15 years later, I had turned an early fascination into a thriving and successful career. I was traveling all over the world for work, including countries as far-flung as New Zealand and Iceland, Armenia and Sudan. I studied film and cinematography in Sydney, Australia, grew a freelance photography business from the ground up, and was seemingly absent of any ode to the timid teenager I had once been. 

But there was a fatal flaw and growing chasm in the foundation of this career and pursuit. 


 

Our words will always be the tell of our hearts, and our actions will always be the subject of our desires.

 

While on a trip to Los Angeles purposed for networking and meeting with a myriad of other creatives, artists, and influencers, I noticed a trend in the line of conversations I was having. 

Followers, financial freedom, web traffic, analytics, ROI, the hustle and grind, and entrepreneurial success. 

These were the adjectives that inundated our conversations and the objectives that seemed to dictate our lives. Don't get me wrong; it's normal to discuss what you're actively engaged in and building. And I love connecting with other creatives to talk business and strategy - the community in the creative world is one of my favorite things about my career.

The problem enters when you apply scripture to the continuity of our conversations as creatives: "Out of the overflow of the heart, the mouth speaks."

Our words will always be the tell of our hearts, and our actions will always be the subject of our desires.

And this, from the outset, is the foundation for, the subject of and the purpose around this website and all that will come with it. It's the crux of our faith and the centerpoint for us as creatives, influencers and artists. It's the why behind the what, the cause behind the creations and the purpose by which we engage our gifts. 

Of all that you have done and are doing, what will last?


 

Of all that you have done and are doing, what will last?

 

In his letter to the Corinthians, the Apostle Paul reminded them, and us by affect, of this:  "For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each of us may receive what is due us for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad. (2 Corinthians 5:10)." Or in other words:

Of all that you have done and are doing, what will last?

When this life ends, and we stand before the throne of Grace; when all that we have spent our lives creating, building and working towards is thrown into the eternal flame - with only the eternal work remaining amidst the flames - what of everything we have done comes to the surface and lasts?

Maybe better said, in all of our pursuits, passions, and projects, where was the Kingdom work? Where were we serving, giving, helping, discipling, teaching, and sacrificing? How were we pouring ourselves out for the cause of Christ and the betterment of others?  

Where were we using the gifts we have been given for the cause of Christ, the gospel? 


 

I've become aware of a gap between the orthodox and the artist, the traditional and the experimental, the church and the creative individual

 

Personally, after years of working, striving, building and creating, this is what I had to wrestle with. I had to be honest, real and transparent with myself about where I was, what I was doing and creating, and where that was heading. And in that honesty I found something. 

I became aware of a gap between the orthodox and the artist, the traditional and the experimental, the church and the creative individual. I found that for most artisans, discipleship, mentorship and leadership lacked. And as that gap continues to widen, the propensity for those of like minds to be pulled away by the adjectives that filled my Los Angeles conversations is imminent. 

And therein lies the purpose for this site and all that is coming along with it. 

Simply stated, my desire is to help create resources for the creatives who find themselves in a wrestle between their faith the pursuit of a career. I want to foster a place in which conversation can take place by way of scripture & its view on modern issues; by which to better unite the Divine and the daring artists, and help resource the innately creative. 

And it's a conversation you're invited to be a part of.